5 Best Hardware Wallets to Store Your Bitcoin (In 2020 ...

Cold Storage: Can I just backup my wallet.dat file n USB and then delete the Bitcoin Core/qt off my computer?

Or does deleting the Bitcoin Core cause issues later with importing, specifically if I downloaded it onto another computer?
submitted by saskmine to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

12-03 22:03 - 'Are USB hardware wallets considered cold storage?' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/bilbobagholder removed from /r/Bitcoin within 1646-1656min

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Do you consider USB hardware wallets like trezor to be "cold storage"?
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Are USB hardware wallets considered cold storage?
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: bilbobagholder
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Keeping a wallet on a usb storage device ? /r/Bitcoin

Keeping a wallet on a usb storage device ? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] Why can't you just store the wallet offline on an usb stick? Not cold storage/hard ware. Just a r...

The following post by f39ewjdwje932 is being replicated because the post has been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7inmlt
The original post's content was as follows:
Wouldn't it keep it safe from hackers? I tried googling it, but never found anyone discussing this. Only Ledger and such.
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

Are USB hardware wallets considered cold storage? /r/Bitcoin

Are USB hardware wallets considered cold storage? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Why can't you just store the wallet offline on an usb stick? Not cold storage/hard ware. Just a regular usb stick? /r/Bitcoin

Why can't you just store the wallet offline on an usb stick? Not cold storage/hard ware. Just a regular usb stick? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Best bitcoin wallet for offline USB storage (PC/Windows)?

submitted by HurricaneTerminator to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[WFS] Ultimate Bitcoin Wallet Storage (USB 8GB)

[WFS] Ultimate Bitcoin Wallet Storage (USB 8GB) submitted by carbidewallet to BitMarket [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Fullnode Install Guide for Dummies ;-)

Bitcoin Fullnode Install Guide for Dummies ;-)
Feel free to stop at Level 0 or Level 1, which is fine. More advanced configs are offered to those with more tech savvy. This guide, obviously assumes a Windows 10 install, but other OSes work fine, just find a different guide. BTW, the "For Dummies" is a callback to a set of "tech" books in the 90's intended to be as easy as possible. It is in jest and not intended to insult the reader. Finally, if you dislike the formatting, a well formatted copy can be found here
There is a fairly small subset of Bitcoin users that run a full node. I think the idea of running a full node has gotten a bad rap over the years since there is so much talk about running on a Raspberry Pi, or getting zippy SSDs. Although all of this can be fun, it is often not really required at all. Here are some ways to run a full node starting with the very simple. I'll get into more complex configs, but these are all optional.

Tech Skill Level: 0 (the basics)

  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
In many cases, thats it. If your running a new machine with a fairly good internet connection, 8 or 9 hours will be enough to complete the "Initial Block Download" (IBD). This may fill up your drive a bit, but again, on most new machines, 300 GB of space isn't that hard to come by.

Tech Skill Level: 1 (encrypted wallet)

One thing we left out in the level-0 exercise is encrypting your wallet. It's easy enough to do well, but a bit more difficult to do right. The main challenge is that humans generate really poor passwords. If you want a good password, the best way is to use something called "diceware". Basically, you just grab 4 or 5 dice and each throw of the dice represents a certain word on a special list. The throw {1,4,5,3,1} for example would be the word camping on the EFF-diceware-wordlist. So you repeat this a few times until you have a list of 8 or so words which becomes the passphrase you use to encrypt your wallet. Write it down, it is always hard to remember at first. So at level-1 your list becomes:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Choose Encrypt Wallet from the Settings menu
  5. Enter your 8 word (or so) passphrase generated using the Diceware method

Wallet Encryption Dialog

Tech Skill Level: 2 (enable pruning if needed)

Though I said "300 GB of space isn't hard to come by", some times it actually is. If space is an issue, a simple way to fix it is to tell bitcoin to simple take less space. This is called "pruning" and can take that number from 300 GB down to below 5 GB. If you can't find 5 GB, then you'll have to read ahead to level-4 to add USB storage. But the good news is, enabling pruning is pretty easy, we just add another step to our working list:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Choose Options from the Settings menu
  6. Choose Prune block storage to: and select the max size for the blocks to use
  7. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Pruning Dialog
Note, even setting this to 1 GB will still leave you with about a 4.5 GB install. The blocks take up a lot of space, but the chainstate and other folders eat up at least 3.5 GB and they can't be pruned. Also, be aware, to disable pruning requires you to perform the entire IBD again. While pruned some other functions my be disabled as well, so just know that pruning does limit some functionality.

Tech Skill Level: 3 (verify the installer)

Although this is arguably something that should be done at level-0, some find the intricacies of comparing hash (thumbprint) values to be tedious and beyond the scope of a beginner. You will find these types of hash compares suggested quite often as a way to prevent running tainted programs. Programs are often tainted by bad disk or network performance, but most often, taint is malicious code inserted by viruses or malware. This is a way to guard yourself against those types of attacks.
What I cover here is a very basic comparison on the certificate, but a more thorough verification advised by mosts uses a program called Gpg4Win, and is beyond the scope of this beginners guide. But regardless, most users should strive to do this minimum level of validation.
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer
  3. When prompted "Do you want to allow..." click Show more details
  4. In the details section select Show information about the publisher's certificate
  5. In the certificate window select the Details tab
  6. In the Details tab Subject should start with "CN = Bitcoin Core Code Signing Association"
  7. Ensure Thumbprint in Details reads ea27d3cefb3eb715ed214176a5d027e01ba1ee86
  8. If the checks pass, click OK to exit the certificate window and Yes to allow the installer to run.
  9. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  10. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  11. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish

Certification Validation Windows
Note: The certificate used to sign the current Bitcoin installer is only valid from March 2020 to March 2021. After that point the thumbprint on the certificate will change. This is by design and intentional. If your reading this post after March 2021, then it is understood that the thumbprint has changed.

Tech Skill Level: 4 (use secondary storage)

We glossed over the "new machine with fairly good internet" part. Truth be known many people do not have fairly new machines, and find the IBD to take longer than the "over night" best wishes. For most people the slowdown is the disk access when calculating what is called chainstate. This requires fast random reads and writes to the disk. If you have an SSD disk, this will be no problem, but if you have a non-SSD "spinning" disk, random writes are always slow. Though an SSD will speed things up, they are pricey, so a nice middle ground may be a simple high-end USB key drive. You can get some with 10 to 15 MB/s random writes for $20 on Amazon. This is usually a order of magnitude faster than a "spinning" disk. And with pruning (see level-2), a small USB drive should be fine.
Once you decide on a drive, the tricky part will be to enable external storage. It requires editing a configuration file and adding a line. First, we want to create a directory on the key drive. You will need to determine the drive letter of your USB key drive. For the sake of this example, we will assume it is D:, but you must determine this yourself and correct the example. Once you know the drive letter, create a blank folder on the drive called Bitcoin. So for this example, creating Bitcoin on drive D: will create the path D:\Bitcoin. Once done, assuming that D: is your drive, here are the new steps including the edit of the configuration file:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the installer, verify it, then run it
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish
  6. Launch "Notepad" by typing "Notepad.exe" in the windows search bar then click Open
  7. Type the line datadir=D:\Bitcoin (depending on your drive letter) in the blank file
  8. Choose Save from the File menu in notepad
  9. Type %APPDATA%\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf (note the percent signs) in the File name box
  10. Select All Files from the Save as type dropdown
  11. Click the Save button and overwrite the file if prompted
  12. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Save As Dialog
Now that you've reached this level of technical expertise, there are many new configuration options that you can begin to modify if you wish. Most configuration data is contained in the bitcoin.conf file and learning how to maintain it is a key step for a node operator.

Tech Skill Level: 5 (all other customizations)

Here's a short list of various things you can ADD to your bitcoin.conf file. You generally just add a new line for each configuration settings.
  • addresstype=bech32
  • changetype=bech32
The addresstype / changetype allows your wallet to use the native-segwit (bech32) format. This is the most efficient and inexpensive way to spend bitcoin, and is a recommended configuration. The default uses something called p2sh-segwit which is more compatible with older wallets, but more expensive to spend.
  • minrelaytxfee=0.00000011
Changing the minrelaytxfee setting allows you to help propagate lower fee transactions. It will require more memory but TXN memory is capped at 300 MB by default anyways, so if you have enough memory, it is a good setting to choose.
  • dbcache=2048
The dbcache setting controls how many MB of memory the program will use for the chainstate database. Since this is a key bottleneck in the IBD, setting this value high (2048 MB) will greatly speed up the IBD, assuming you have the memory to spare
  • blocksdir=C:\Bitcoin
  • datadir=D:\Bitcoin
In level-4 we discussed moving the datadir to a fast external storage, but the majority of the space used for bitcoin is the blocks directory (blocksdir). Although you should always use for fastest storage for datadir, you are free to use slow storage for blocksdir. So if you only want to consume a small amount of your SSD (assumed D:) then you can keep your blocks on your slow "spinning" drive.
  • upnp=1
One of the harder challenges you may face running a node, is to get incoming connections. If you are lucky, you may find that your firewall and network HW support the uPnP protocol. If they do, this setting will allow bitcoin to configure uPnP to allow incoming connections to your node. Other methods exist to make your node reachable, but they are well beyond the scope of this guide.
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Everyday info sec, hardcore info sec, and DNMs

Edit: Currently writing a new version of this, dont know when it will be done.
Edit: Since first post I have updated a few sections with additional information.
I recommend reading it all even if it is very long, I might have placed some relevant info in different sections while thinking about what else needed to be added, plenty of steps remains mostly the same except when I comment directly on it. It is not necessary to do 100% security all the time, unless you absolutely need it, combining some high and some lower security ideas for a balance of security and convenience is useful.
I will base this mostly on Windows, Linux users probably know this, and I have no idea how apple machines work (tho many things in here are still relevant for other operating systems, as they are just general tips)
Disclaimer: There are certainly other steps that can make you more anonymous or safer, however I think for most people this will surfice. Any software I recommend should be independently verified for security, and examples of software are not to be taken as endorsements. I simply use examples and give recommendations when I believe it necessary, or helpful.
I will not really differentiate between anonymity and security, they are often the same thing. As such the word security can mean either more anonymous, less vulnerable, or both.
--------
Everyday Simple Info Sec:
-There could be a hidden administrator user on your PC, make sure to change its password
(Snapchat msgs, reddit dms, discord msgs, are just a few examples of msgs that are never encrypted)
-Any info even send in encrypted msgs (and obviously non encrypted) should still be kept with possible deniability, don't say "I'm gonna do MDMA", say "I'm going out with molly."
-DO NOT STORE ANY PASSWORDS ON GOOGLE, IF GOOGLE LOGIN IS AUTHENTICATED IT WILL AUTFILL ALL PASSWORDS IT HAS SAVED (same with other similar services) (This means if you are logged in to chrome and someone has access to your machine, they can auto fill passwords without entering a single password)
-use a rememberable passphrase, especially for your master key ring aka password manager A long sentence that is memorable makes an okay password (decent example,: "I met my wife at Little Ceasers for the first time on 07/09/20" better even if it's just something you know, if its impersonal, and if you can add special characters or numbers that you won't forget) (A better example for a passphrase is: "There is 0nly 0ne letter that d0esn’t appear in any U.S. state nameQ")
-Purge your internet activity frequently, there's a reason why I only have one post, and a few comments appearing in my account, but thousands of kama. Exposing information needlessly is not good.
-Never post private information publicly, and if you do, do it vaguely as possible. (Example: Not "I'm 15", say "I'm a teenager") Do not post any vital information ever, no birthdays, mother's maiden name, age, or anything you have ever seen in a security question. Never post your current activities while they are ongoing. You going on a vacation? Don't announce it to the world, taking picture there? Post them when you are home.
-Rethink how you do security questions. Many answers to security questions can be found in your internet history. One could use the first word of the security question as an answer, or a different sceme that will mean you always remember it. (Security question need to go, the amount of personal info an average person puts on the internet makes it easy to attack anything using security question)
-------_
High level crimimal information security:
The motto here is, "All the Security, All the Time" As one fuck up can end with you leaving a lick of traceability, and you could be fucked.
Pre Note: All of your software should always be up to date. Also even perfect info sec does not guarantee you are completely safe, a new zero day (exploit) can still fuck you, but good info security makes you significantly safer, by eliminating as many attacks as possible.
-Get a new device (or make a already owned device seem like you never owned it, do this only if you know how to, there's a lot of stuff that goes into that, like changing your mac adress etc) buy with cash, and your face covered, preferably far away from where you live. (Do I need to specify to not bring your phone or anything else that tracks your location to anywhere you want to go anonymously?) (Be aware that even hardware can have vulnerabilities, many cpus have known vulnerabilities, I can't list them all, do some research before buying)
-If you know how to use Tails (A linux distro designed for Info sec) use that, preferably on a USB. (Or learn how to use tails, its better, but complicated) Otherwise a clean copy of windows (make sure its not in any way associated with you) can do the job too, tho not as well. (Using a VM might give extra security, since VMs usually erase all data and RAM they were using on shutdown)
-Get a non tracking VPN, Enable the kill switch (a setting that disables all traffic that doesn't go through the VPN) (change your firewall settings to only allow the traffic from the VPN, windows guide (Change settings so only traffic from the tor application is send) Edit: (Due to complaints: do not use vpn over tor, use tor over vpn. tor over vpn has no notable downside, if the VPN logs it makes no difference, your ISP will always log anyways, and vpns remove other attack vectors and also provide backup security should tor fail. Again even if the VPN tracks you only change the people doing the tracking, but now you are further removed making it more anonymous and also with less vulnerabilities)
-rember privacy settings, cookie cleaner, and antivirus, password (There could be a hidden administrator user on your PC, make sure to change its password)
-Always use the device on a non admin account
-Ideally use this device only on networks that are not connected with you. Such as public networks (try to never use the same public networks twice, move around) (a home network should be fine now, as it should never be exposed, but more security is always better) (Its just a conveniences vs security trade)
-Never use accounts that have been exposed to lower security on higher security machines
-your browser is now TOR (or your preferred security focused browser, if you dont plan on using onion ) Make sure you get the standalone version of tor not the addon build (the standalone is safer, because there are less settings and options to tweak)
-Change your tor settings, to safest mode, enable a bridge (to my knowledge there's no difference in security between the build in bridges in tor), enable automatic updates, set duckduckgo onion as your primary browser. Set dark.fail onion page as your home page. (Or your preferred privacy search engine and onion directory)
-------_
How to use dark net markets (DNMs)
If you finished your High Security setup, we can dive right in. Otherwise go do that. This is where all that is essential.
Quick info on Tor, and onion sites. There is no search engine. It's all based of directories and addresses you are given by others. Tor will likely not be very quick, it has to pass through multiple networks to get to the destination. DNMs sometimes exit scam, an exit scam is when a market shuts down completely and takes all the money, this is a risk when using DNMs, it's not too common but happens maybe 0-4 times a year. The admins of thoese servers need to get out at some point, before they get jailed, so they exit the game, and scam everyone out of their money.
-A very useful onion directory is dark.fail it has a lot of links, for all kinds of stuff. News, email, DNMs, Psychonautwiki (harm reduction website), forums etc. (Other directories also exist)
-Pick a market, preferably one that handles secure connection server side instead of requiring you to establish the secure connection. Then create an account. Your account once created should include an entry box in your profile for a pgp key, post your PUBLIC key in there. (Verify the link is not a scam, most markets should provide a pgp signature)
-Next is currency setup. All major cryptocurrency exchangers can be used, I can recommend coin base but there could be better ones out there. Unless you find a small non U.S., exchange, they will always ask for your identity. So unless you can find a trustworthy exchange that doesn't ID, you will need to give it to them. (Side note, all major crypto exchangers report to the IRS, if the IRS asks you if you bought cryptocurrency and you bought while having IDed yourself SAY YES, DO NOT COMMIT TAX FRAUD WHEN THEY KNOW YOU DID)
-Transfer (monero you can send directly, btc you should scramble) to your wallet. There are two options a cold wallet (physical) or a software wallet. Software wallets usually dont cost anything so I recommend them, even if often less safe. Electrum is easy to use, and pretty safe. You can also do your own research and find a wallet that fits your needs.
-now you are ready to buy, only buy using escrow (it means the money is held by the market as a middle man until the product is delivered, they will also handle any issues like wrong quantity, cuts, etc), judge the reviews for a product, and if available look at the history of the vendor, until you find a product from a vendor you trust. (I recommend to buy within your country as much as possible, so it doesn't go through customs, it's very rare that something is found, but it can happen)
-now you get to buy, depending on market, you either have cryptocurrency stored in their wallets (not recommend, you will lose it in an exit scam) or you can send it every order. When you send your delivery adress (or the one you want it to go to) encrypt the adress using the sellers public key. Make sure the adress is correct.
-wait for the product, make sure to extend the escrow until the product arrives, if you can't extend it anymore dispute the order, and a moderator will step in
-test the product, use it, and leave a review. PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW, DNMs only work because of reviews.
Edit: Didn't imagine I would write over 15000 words. Oh well, it was fun. Hope it helps, if you have any questions feel free to ask.
No idea how long this will stay up, I might purge it in 7 days, or never.
submitted by seven_N_A7 to u/seven_N_A7 [link] [comments]

Newbie has some questions about his privacy

Hey Guys,
Im new to Monero and Im really fascinated by it so far. I used Bitcoin in the past but want to switch to Monero. This change has privacy reasons, thats why I want to make sure that how I use Monero is really safe, otherwise my change would not be worth it. I have some questions:

- Can I use Monero on my Computer without Tails? Will it still be private? I dont have enough storage for the blockchain on my Tails USB
- If I use Monero over the Cake wallet on my phone (connected to local node on my PC) is it also safe? And if I want to make a transaction with my cake wallet, does my PC with the local node need to be running or can it be offline?

thank you
submitted by Apfelmus1517 to Monero [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Miner Blues

I’m a shovel-and-pick Bitcoin miner. I don’t bother with mining the coins directly. That’s gotten too rich for my blood.
Instead, I keep an eye out for old computers on Craigslist and the like. I’m looking for 2010-ish machines. At that time, you could mine a few Bitcoins a day with just a CPU. They weren’t worth much. Millions of dollars in abandoned Bitcoins are sitting, forgotten, on hobby hard drives and cast-off machines in basements and storage units. Find a neat little wallet.dat file with even a few coins on it, and you’ve collected a handsome payday for $50 cash.
I’ve gotten lucky exactly three times. I was hoping to round the bases with this latest lead. Five HPs, relatively powerful for their time - which was 2007. I could have the lot for $200 if I met my Craigslist contact Saturday morning at Your-Self Storage in Brackenridge.
Apparently, the fees for the storage unit hadn’t been paid in three years. It was slated to be auctioned off, but the Your-Self franchise owner thought he could squeeze a little more cash out of the situation by selling off the contents piecemeal.
Apart from the computers, there wasn’t much in there. Two old, overstuffed chairs. A box of little hand-mirrors. A suitcase with a broken luggage lock. And - in pristine condition - the HPs.
I handed over the $200, loaded up the computers, and headed back to my flat. I don’t even bother to try booting the original systems - too much risk to the (potentially) precious data.
I ripped out those old spinners and plugged them, one at a time, into my USB enclosure.
The first four were duds. It didn’t look like they’d ever been used. Not a single thing on the drives beyond the OS.
The fifth, though - it was damn near full. No wallet.dat - but nearly 15 gigs of photos. And I don’t know what to do.
See, they’re all photos of the same woman. And - if you have the stomach for it - you can kind of piece together a story.
There she is, in a varsity sweater. And again, with an older man with ginger hair, sitting by a lake somewhere. And then again, on horseback, with the sun setting behind her.
And again - her hair cut messily away. And again - absent any teeth, her mascara smeared. And again, with a good half of her skin cut away. And then-
I’m going to call the police, and then I’m going to call Your-Self Storage. I’m going to warn them not to touch that suitcase with the broken lock.
submitted by Suckstoyourassmar2 to shortscarystories [link] [comments]

Cheapskates guide to not buying a hardware wallet and staying 100% safe

  1. Download Tails and install to USB drive
  2. verify Tails using OpenPGP
  3. unplug your eithernet cable or turn off your wifi. Run Tails and open Electrum, it comes preinstalled
  4. Create wallet. Write down or print out SEED and backup wallet to a USB drive. Keep these in a fire safe.
  5. warning the tails usb drive deletes everything, make sure you saved to a 2nd flashdrive or the special storage option they have.
  6. On a different USB drive copy the MASTER PUBLIC KEY to a .txt file.
  7. Remove flash drives. Restart computer and boot windows. Download Electrum and import the MASTER PUBLIC KEY. This creates a Watch-Only wallet that will allow you view and recieve bitcoin.
  8. If you ever want to send bitcoin, just boot into Tails and send from there.
  9. Use the $60 you saved to buy moar bitcoin

Never use this tails drive for exploring on tor or anything except sending bitcoin. keep it pure and clean.
Never plug in your flashdrive with the wallet while running windows.
submitted by atrueretard to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Secure Your Digital Assets with a Safe Deposit Box

Cryptocurrency, Dubbed By Some As Digital Gold, Has Been Making Great Changes In The Global Investment Landscape Over The Past Decade. Digital Assets Such As Bitcoin, Ethereum, And XRP Represent A New Asset Class That’s Is Fast Becoming An Alluring Addition To Investor Portfolios Worldwide.
However, Just Like Any Investment Option, There Are A Number Of Potential Risks Associated With Digital Assets. Let’s Discuss How You Can Help Secure Your Digital Assets Through The Use Of A Safety Deposit Box.
Why Are Digital Assets Alluring?
Part Of The Appeal Of Cryptocurrency Is That Unlike Fiat Money, Its Value Is Defined By People’s Demand, It Cannot Be Manipulated By Governments, They’re Accessible Worldwide, And They Are Highly Secure.
Moreover, They Are Supplied In Limited Quantities And You Cannot Simply Print More If It, They Cannot Be Copied Or Altered, And The Transactions Made Are Irreversible.
In Addition, Investors Lean Towards Digital Assets Because Of The Transparency That Blockchain Provides And Because Anyone Who Has Access To The Internet And Has Funds To Spare, Is Able To Make An Investment In It.
Digital Investments Have Security Risks
However, Given The Nature Of Cryptocurrency, It Is Still Open To Security Risks Such As Hacking And Theft.
While Blockchains Have Long Been Giving Investors Peace Of Mind With The Security It Provides To Cryptocurrency, New Reports Are Suggesting That They Aren’t As Safe As They Used To Be.
There Are Also Reports Of Cryptocurrency Theft Which Begs The Question: How Do We Keep A Watchful Eye Over Our Digital Assets?
Cold Storage To Minimize Your Security Risk
In Order To Make Digital Assets Safe From The Threats Of Security Risks, It’s Important To Understand How To Properly And Securely Store Them. One Of The Most Popular Security Options Available For Crypto Investors Today Is Known As Cold Storage.
Cold Storage Or Cold Wallets Allow You To Store Your Private Keys To Your Digital Assets Offline And Away From Hackers. Cold Storage Usually Comes In Two Formats—Hardware Wallets Or Paper Wallets.
Hardware Wallets Are USB Drives That Hold Private Keys. They Are A Go-To Option For Investors Since They Are Lightweight And Easy To Carry, Even If You’re On The Move.
On The Other Hand, Paper Wallets Are Pieces Of Paper That Contain A Wallet’s Private Keys. These Usually Contain QR Codes And Are Commonly Used To Store Digital Assets For Long Periods Provided That They Are Housed In A Safe Deposit Box Away From Damage.
Private Vaulting Facilities Are Your Digital Asset Solution
Just Like Your Physical Assets, You Wouldn’t Want To Store Your Cold Storage At Home Under The Mattress Or Between Your Floorboards. That’s Why At Reputable Private Vaulting Facilities, Safe Deposit Boxes Are Offered That Solve Your Cold Storage Needs For Your Cryptocurrency Wallets.
Private, World-Class Facilities Utilise Multiple Physical And Biometric Layers Of Security, So Your Digital Assets Remain Completely Safe From The Threats Of Hacking, Theft As Well As Natural Disasters Such As Floods And Fires. Premium Establishments Also Use Facial Recognition To Enable Access To Your Private Vault, Along With Many Physical Barriers To Securely Protect Your Assets.
This Includes Multiple Mantraps, A Secure PIN Code, Staff Oversight, Day Gate Entry And A UL Rated Vault. Lastly, As A Customer, You Possess The Only Set Of Keys Which Allow Access To Your Safe Deposit Box. With All This In Mind, What More Could You Possible Need To Secure Your Digital Assets With A Safe Deposit Box?
submitted by shrutijaiswal07 to u/shrutijaiswal07 [link] [comments]

Test

Test
There is a fairly small subset of Bitcoin users that run a full node. I think the idea of running a full node has gotten a bad rap over the years since there is so much talk about running on a Raspberry Pi, or getting zippy SSDs. Although all of this can be fun, it is often not really required at all. Here are some ways to run a full node starting with the very simple. I'll get into more complex configs, but these are all optional.

Tech Skill Level: 0 (the basics)

  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
In many cases, thats it. If your running a new machine with a fairly good internet connection, 8 or 9 hours will be enough to complete the "Initial Block Download" (IBD). This may fill up your drive a bit, but again, on most new machines, 300 GB of space isn't that hard to come by.

Tech Skill Level: 1 (encrypted wallet)

One thing we left out in the level-0 exercise is encrypting your wallet. It's easy enough to do well, but a bit more difficult to do right. The main challenge is that humans generate really poor passwords. If you want a good password, the best way is to use something called "diceware". Basically, you just grab 4 or 5 dice and each throw of the dice represents a certain word on a special list. The throw {1,4,5,3,1} for example would be the word camping on the EFF-diceware-wordlist. So you repeat this a few times until you have a list of 8 or so words which becomes the passphrase you use to encrypt your wallet. Write it down, it is always hard to remember at first. So at level-1 your list becomes:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Choose Encrypt Wallet from the Settings Menu
  5. Enter your 8 word (or so) passphrase generated using the Diceware method

Wallet Encryption Dialog

Tech Skill Level: 2 (enable pruning if needed)

Though I said "300 GB of space isn't hard to come by", some times it actually is. If space is an issue, a simple way to fix it is to tell bitcoin to simple take less space. This is called "pruning" and can take that number from 300 GB down to below 5 GB. If you can't find 5 GB, then you'll have to read ahead to level-3 to add USB storage. But the good news is, enabling pruning is pretty easy, we just add another step to our working list:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Choose Options from the Settings Menu
  6. Choose Prune block storage to: and select the max size for the blocks to use
  7. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Pruning Dialog
Note, even setting this to 1 GB will still leave you with about a 4.5 GB install. The blocks take up a lot of space, but the chainstate and other folders eat up at least 3.5 GB and they can't be pruned. Also, be aware, to disable pruning requires you to perform the entire IBD again. While pruned some other functions my be disabled as well, so just know that pruning does limit some functionality.

Tech Skill Level: 3 (verify the installer)

Although this is arguably something that should be done at level-0, some find the intricacies of comparing hash (thumbprint) values to be tedious and beyond the scope of a beginner. You will find these types of hash compares suggested quite often as a way to prevent running tainted programs. Programs are often tainted by bad disk or network performance, but most often, taint is malicious code inserted by viruses or malware. This is a way to guard yourself against those types of attacks. What I cover here is a very basic comparison on the certificate, but a more thorough comparison advised by mosts uses a program called Gpg4Win, and is beyond the scope of this beginners guide. But regardless, most users should strive to do this minimum level of validation.
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer
  3. When prompted "Do you want to allow..." click Show more details
  4. In the details section select Show information about the publisher's certificate
  5. In the certificate window select the Details tab
  6. In the Details tab Subject should start with "CN = Bitcoin Core Code Signing Association"
  7. Also ensure Thumbprint reads ea27d3cefb3eb715ed214176a5d027e01ba1ee86
  8. If the checks pass, click OK to exit the certificate window and Yes to allow the installer to run.
  9. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  10. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  11. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish

Certification Validation Windows
Note: The certificate used to sign the current Bitcoin installer is only valid from March 2020 to March 2021. After that point the thumbprint on the certificate will change. This is by design and intentional. If your reading this post after March 2021, then it is understood that the thumbprint has changed.

Tech Skill Level: 4 (use secondary storage)

We glossed over the "new machine with fairly good internet" part. Truth me known many people do not have fairly new machines, and find the IBD to take longer than the "over night" best wishes. For most people the slowdown is the disk access when calculating what is called chainstate. This requires fast random reads and writes to the disk. If you have an SSD disk, this will be no problem, but if you have a non-SSD "spinning" disk, random writes are always slow. Though an SSD will speed things up, they are pricey, so a nice middle ground may be a simple high-end USB key drive. You can get some with 10 to 15 MB/s random writes which is usually a order of magnitude faster than a "spinning" disk. And with pruning (see level-2), a small USB drive should be fine.
Once you decide on a drive, the tricky part will be to enable external storage. It requires editing a configuration file and adding a few lines. The configuration file needs to be in both the default directory, and USB key drive, but before we do that, we want to create a directory on the key drive. You will need to determine the drive letter of your USB key drive. For the sake of this example, we will assume it is D:, but you must determine this yourself and correct the example. Once you know the drive letter, create a blank folder on the drive called Bitcoin. So for this example, creating Bitcoin on drive D: will create the path D:\Bitcoin. Once done, assuming that D: is your drive, here are the steps to edit the two configuration files:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the installer, verify it, then run it
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish
  6. Launch "Notepad" by typing "Notepad.exe" in the windows search bar then click Open
  7. Type the line datadir=D:\Bitcoin (depending on your drive letter) in the blank file
  8. Choose Save from the File menu in notepad
  9. Type %APPDATA%\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf (note the percent signs) in the File name box
  10. Select All Files from the Save as type dropdown
  11. Click the Save button and overwrite the file if prompted
  12. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Save As Dialog
Now that you've reached this level of technical expertise, there are many new configuration options that you can begin to modify if you wish. Most configuration data is contained in the bitcoin.conf file and learning how to maintain it is a key step for a node operator.

Tech Skill Level: 5 (all other customizations)

Here's a short list of various things you can ADD to your bitcoin.conf file. You generally just add a new line for each configuration settings.
  • addresstype=bech32
  • changetype=bech32
The addresstype / changetype allows your wallet to use the native-segwit (bech32) format. This is the most efficient and inexpensive way to spend bitcoin, and is a recommended configuration. The default uses something called p2sh-segwit which is more compatible with older wallets, but more expensive to spend.
  • minrelaytxfee=0.00000011
Changing the minrelaytxfee setting allows you to help propagate lower fee transactions. It will require more memory but TXN memory is capped at 300 MB by default anyways, so if you have enough memory, it is a good setting to choose.
  • dbcache=2048
The dbcache setting controls how many MB of memory the program will use for the chainstate database. Since this is a key bottleneck in the IBD, setting this value high (2048 MB) will greatly speed up the IBD, assuming you have the memory to spare
  • blocksdir=C:\Bitcoin
  • datadir=D:\Bitcoin
In level-4 we discussed moving the datadir to a fast external storage, but the majority of the space used for bitcoin is the blocks directory (blocksdir). Although you should always use for fastest storage for datadir, you are free to use slow storage for blocksdir. So if you only want to consume a small amount of your SSD (assumed D:) then you can keep your blocks on your slow "spinning" drive.
  • upnp=1
One of the harder challenges you may face running a node, is to get incoming connections. If you are lucky, you may find that your firewall and network HW support the uPnP protocol. If they do, this setting will allow bitcoin to configure uPnP to allow incoming connections to your node.
submitted by brianddk to brianddk [link] [comments]

What I currently use for privacy

So this is what software I currently use for privacy, would like some opinions if possible:
Starting with my cellphone, my device is a Google Pixel 3A XL with GrapheneOS flashed, I have the following apps installed:
F-Droid and AuroraOSS (as my app stores), NewPipe (youtube client), Vanadium (web browser), Tutanota and K-9 Mail (for e-mails), OsmAnd+ (for maps), Joplin (notes), Open Camera (camera), OpenBoard and Mozc for Android (Keyboard and Japanese Keyboard), Aegis Authenticator, KeePassDX (password manager), LibreTorrent (torrent client), Librera PRO (pdf/epub/mobi reader, I don't own a Kindle nor want to own one so I use my cellphone to read), Tachiyomi (manga reader), Signal (for messaging), Vinyl Music Player, VLC, Simple Gallery Pro and Simple Calendar Pro (I prefer them over stock Graphene options) and I also use Electrum and Samourai (Bitcoin Wallet) and Monerujo (Monero Wallet)
I also have OpenVPN (for VPN) and use a private DNS for ad and tracking blocking (provided by my VPN provider)
I have 3-4 PCs, will go over every single one of them:
my main PC is a desktop PC (that I built myself) that I mainly use for working and other tasks.
It runs Artix Linux (basically Arch Linux without systemd), I use UFW as my firewall (denying all incoming and also denying all outgoing only allowing what is useful) and I also use AppArmor Profiles, I disabled IPV6 and SWAP, configured my VPN connection as well on network settings and I currently run OpenVPN on my computer (my VPN provider allows for multi-hop cascade through OpenVPN in which I can create a custom VPN cascade up to four servers, each consecutive hop re-encrypts my traffic and assigns me a new IP address) and I've also set disk encryption on installation (have set in all of my computers)
As for software: I use Mozilla Firefox as my web browser (I set it to always be in private mode, unchecked suggestions for browsing history, bookmarks, and open tabs, I've also disabled the Firefox data collection in settings and block dangerous and deceptive content, I use DuckDuckGo as my search engine, I use Firefox Home as my default as my homepage. The rest of my tweaks were done in about:config (using privacytools.io site tweaks + geo.enabled = false, network.cookie.lifetimePolicy = 2 and dom.security.https_only_mode as true which are not listed on the site) and the only addons I use are uBlock Origin on Hard Mode and Decentraleyes), KeePassXC (password manager), VIM (use it as a Text Editor and as an IDE for coding), LibreOffice (for working stuff), GIMP (image editor), VLC, qBitTorrent and Tutanota's Desktop Client and Thunderbird (for e-mails)
I also use KVM/QEMU for virtual machines (usually in case I wanna test some distro or use Tails/Whonix)
For my gaming PC (also a desktop I've built myself) I run Manjaro KDE on it, the only apps I have in the system are Firefox (same settings as above), OBS and KVM/QEMU (which I use a Win10 virtual machine for games, there are tutorials on YouTube on how to do so if you're interested). I have the same firewall settings as above, using AppArmor as well and I've also disabled IPV6 and SWAP, I run OpenVPN on it as well as my VPN DNS settings on network settings. I also use different mouse and keyboard on both my PCs and never mix them together.
My other 2 PCs are both laptops, one is a Acer Aspire Nitro I've bought for work (in case I need to work while in a trip or if I wanna work outside etc), it has the same settings and programs as my main PC but I run Gentoo on it. The other laptop is an old ThinkPad that runs Slackware on it, but I rarely use it and this laptop is most of the times not with me for safety reasons.
For some other devices and stuff: I have an Asus RT-AC86U router with OpenWRT flashed on it that I also run OpenVPN config files (this one coming from another provider, I use two VPN providers, on in my PCs and the other in my router), I have a Ledger Nano S as a hardware wallet for both Bitcoin and Monero (most of my cryptocurrency is there, I use hardware wallet for hodling purposes and as my emergency funding) and I have LOTS of USB flash drivers (all of them for Linux Live ISOs purposes), I also have a Nintendo Switch Lite (only gaming console I have, although have not been playing that much on it recently) that I only connect to the internet in case I need to download some updates or play online and after I'm done I immediately disconnect it from the internet.
Some other privacy habits I have are:
I don't own any smart device like Smart TVs (I've been more than 10 years now without watching TV, doesn't even bother me), Smart Fridges or Dishwashers that connect to your internet, ROOMBAS, Smart Home etc, I keep all my money on crypto (and I have a small amount in gold as well, but I rarely invest on it, all my gold is stored in a manual safe here in my apartment) and I only have like, 10 bucks or so in my back account (as soon as I receive any money I just left the necessary in my account to pay bills and put all the rest on crypto, I try to pay everything on crypto or cash), I RARELY use cloud storage, but if I need to, I go with NextCloud and encrypt all my files with VeraCrypt before uploading it, all my VPN services were paid with Bitcoin (I try to pay everything with crypto as previously said) and I never write directly into any website, I usually write my text on a text editor, copy it and paste it on the website (needless to say that I don't use mainstream social media as well)
So, what do you guys think? anything that you would add your recommend me? (before anyone mentions about self-hosting a DNS server using Pi-hole on a Raspberry Pi, I'm actually thinking on doing it in a near future)
EDIT: forgot to mention that I don't watch YouTube on PC on youtube site, I mostly watch youtube's videos on invidio.us and only use the youtube site for watching live streams honestly. And I also barely go outside with my smartphone (only if I really need to) and I usually keep it away from my computers etc.
EDIT 2: also another thing: I covered all my laptop's webcams with black electrical tape, I have a Logitech C922 Pro webcam for my desktop PCs but rarely use it, and when I need to use it, I unplug it as soon as I'm done with it.
submitted by SlackAcademic to privacytoolsIO [link] [comments]

Compromised wallet.dat

Compromised wallet.dat
Hello,I am writing on behalf of my friend and I would like your input / advice to what might have happened.
Back in 2013, my friend purchased around 5 BTC that were stored in on his PC
- he used some of it in 2014/15 and was left with 4.9 BTC
- he claimed bch in 2018
- he stored wallet.dat on USB , not on his laptop, for years.
Last week he figured it would be safer to move them to a cold storage, after sync with bitcoin core to his surprise 4.9 BTC were gone and the worst part is that it happened few days before he decided to move it to Trezor.
tx history
The weird part is whoever took wiped clean the wallet, didn't do it in one G, and since claiming BCH he didn't touch or anyone the USB for good 2 years.
I just want your input guys, what do you think? what might have happened.
Bonus question:
Checking the 12eErRLWbJJzA9AHQ3N1mc5rqfp7aMkK2J address on various explorers shows different "received" amount , how come? Thx!

https://live.blockcypher.com/btc/address/12eErRLWbJJzA9AHQ3N1mc5rqfp7aMkK2J/

https://btc.com/12eErRLWbJJzA9AHQ3N1mc5rqfp7aMkK2J

Thank you
submitted by SpecialistDuck3318 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

08-31 08:44 - '[quote] Why are so many people who have no idea what OP was talking about feel the inclination to comment? No offense, but you're like the 3rd person making a complete strawman point. / The usb system doesn't hold any impo...' by /u/Thanatos_1 removed from /r/Bitcoin within 674-684min

'''
I would never use a usb as cold storage, especially not a 5$ one. You don’t buy a 5$ dollar safe to store your valuables in.
Why are so many people who have no idea what OP was talking about feel the inclination to comment? No offense, but you're like the 3rd person making a complete strawman point.
The usb system doesn't hold any important information. The Tails system is ephemeral. Every time you want to spend from your Tails/Electrum-cold-storage, you have to recreate the wallet in a fresh, pristine system.
The medium that holds the important information, the seed, is paper, your brain and/or whatever else you choose to record it on, maybe a metal plate. But not the flash drive.
'''
Context Link
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: Thanatos_1
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

The Different Types of Crypto Wallets

Cryptocurrency wallet is a set of private and public keys that validates the ownership of a digital asset (e.g. Bitcoin), and allows the wallet owner to send and receive digital assets or even store them. There are several types of wallets that can store your crypto holdings, some more secure than other, some are easily accessible and some are dedicated to certain assets. There are two types of wallets, Hot wallets and Cold wallets. The hot wallets are connected to the internet which makes transfers of coins and tokens faster and on hand, yet are more susceptible to viruses and hackers. The cold wallet refers to the cryptocurrency wallets that are offline. Generally cold storage is more secure, but are limited to a selection of coins and tokens you can store.
Software Wallets
Software wallets, as the name suggests, are downloaded and installed on desktops and laptops; they reside on a desktop which can only be accessed on that device where they are installed. They do provide a good level of security but many things could happen to your device, such as viruses or a hardware issue which could deny you access to the wallet, so its recommended to export your wallet private keys and store your login and password on a USB stick or on another device. You can re-install the software on a new device and use your login/password along with the exported private keys to access your funds. One of the most popular software wallets available for free is Exodus were you can store over a 100 cryptocurrency assets.
Paper Wallets
One of the first crypto wallets 1st used in the early 2010s which contains your wallet address, private keys and a QR code representing these keys, which eases the transfer and receiving of coins or tokens. Rather than typing each letter and number of the address which could be hectic, one can just scan the QR code and request or receive the asset. Paper wallets ensure security by preventing your private keys from being exposed online upon creation as its stored physically and not on a computer or online. Theoretically it is strong but physically it is weak, it’s great to have a free wallet that never exposes your private keys online at any point. A paper wallet is not made from a strong and durable material such as metal or plastic, paper can easily tear, burn, the print can fade away from sun exposer, it can get wet and even get lost. Therefore, many have considered this option of the past and are utilizing other safer options to store their cryptos. Here you can create your own paper wallet via the wallet generator.
Mobile/App Wallet
Mobile wallets are considered to be the most popular and commonly used type of wallets; they are apps installed on mobile devices and their main advantage is the swift accessibility to funds. Accessing a bunch of features such as sending, receiving, storing, spending. The user-friendly mobile wallet app like crypto.com has multiple services built-ins, you can do all the functions mentioned above, and you also have the option to stake your cryptos and earn profit, you can buy and trade cryptos to add to your existing portfolio at low fees and even request for a loan.
Many upcoming coins and tokens have used 3rd party wallets to store their coins or even have no supported wallets at the early stage which makes them fully dependent of exchanges to store their coins or tokens. Solid crypto projects typically build their own wallets at an early stage; during or post (ICO, IEO, public and private sale) when they distribute their coins/tokens to users. iOWNX is one of the projects that built a dedicated wallet where you can store both Ethereum and iOWN Tokens with several security measures to protect your assets. You can install the wallet app on both Apple and Android for free.
Hardware Wallet
Known as a “Cold Wallet” which is a physical device and considered to be the safest wallet. Hardware wallet securely stores your private and public keys and typically looks like a USB drive and is resistant to computer viruses. Long term crypto holders prefer a cold wallet as it remains offline most of the time. The wallets are made of metal and hard plastic with an input screen to insert your pin number and in case you lose the device, you can purchase another one and insert your 24-paraphrases known as seed key which was created on your previous device, and access your funds. There are several hardware wallets available in the market; the 2 most popular ones are the Nano Ledger that sell devices from $36 to $148 and the Trezor Wallet which goes for around the same price bracket.
Exchange Wallets
Exchange wallets access blockchain through a browser interface without having to download or install any software. The advantage of the exchange wallets is the ease of accessibility to funds if you are an active trader and require direct access to your funds to be able to trade, rather than transferring coins and tokens from a different wallet which could take some time and fees that disables you to instantly trade at a certain price. The downside of storing your cryptos on an exchange wallet is that some service providers hold and manage the wallet’s private keys on your behalf. Although this may sound more convenient for inexperienced users, it is surely not the best practice. When using cryptocurrency exchanges, you should consider that they provide a high security feature and protection tools such as device management, multi-factor authentication, anti-phishing code, and withdrawal address management. It is highly recommended to store the majority of your coins and tokens in a safer wallet and keep some on the exchange for trading purposes.
There are many types of wallets to choose from to securely store your cryptocurrencies, yet there is not a perfect wallet in existence. Your personal needs and requirements will ultimately guide you to the type of wallets that fits your need. If you are looking for a quick “send and receive” in a few taps then mobile app wallets could be an option. If you are more of a “hodler” and believe in long term store value then Hardware wallets could be the wallet for you. Presuming that you are a swing or an active crypto trader which requires your funds to be available on demand, then storing it on trading platforms and exchanges is convenient, as you can trade your coin or tokens for others and vice versa, instantly without the need to transfer, send and unlocking wallets to access your funds (which requires a bit of time and gas fees).
We hope that you found this guide helpful and that you will be able to find the right crypto wallet that fits your requirement. For more information, you can check out our video “Intro to Crypto Wallets“ which covers in details all types of wallets.
submitted by Iowntoken to u/Iowntoken [link] [comments]

Ledger hardware wallets

I've been seeing a lot of posts about people getting Ledger hardware wallets and I just wanted to understand what they do and how they help.
Looking at their website, there's the Nano X with battery and bluetooth and the Nano S that is just a USB device.
Does it just make a new wallet and store the private key(s) on the device? Is there a way to retrieve the private key(s) other than the "24 words" thing?
I also see there's an app and the Nano X has bluetooth. Can you send/receive from the Nano X by itself? Do you need to have the Nano X with you and connected to the app to send/receive from there?
It sounds like the S is cold storage and the X is used as or with an active wallet, is that right? Is there other things eitheboth of these can do to benefit a Bitcoin owner? I see there are other applications you can install to the devices, but they seem to mainly be other currencies, I only hold BTC and don't have any intention of branching out right now.
Thanks for helping me understand these tools!
submitted by Torisen to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to Cold Store Your Cryptocurrency for Safekeeping

According to CipherTrace (which specializes in litigation tools and services for cryptographic markets), between 2018 and 2019, the amount of theft from cryptographic wallets exceeds $2 billion. Thefts and break-ins are caused by a variety of reasons: simple incompetence in cryptographic storage, as well as by companies that provide storage services. It is not unusual for holders of crypto currency to lose access to their wallets by themselves, one of the last known cases occurred in Ireland: ,57 million dollars couldn’t be confiscated from a detained drug dealer, which were stored in bitcoins. The problem was that the wallets keys were lost.
The most secure way is a cold storage — all account data and private keys are kept offline and all transactions are manual. This storage method is great because it is fully protected from hacking and interception of data, but it is not suitable for those who make daily transfers of cryptocurrency, it is simply inconvenient.
If you compare “cold and hot” wallets, you can give a simple example: A hot wallet can be compared to a wallet that can be lost and stolen. But you can always access your funds. A cold wallet is safe, and access to it is not permanent. You can also take or put money, but it will require a special code.
In this article we will tell you about the most popular types of cold wallets and we will analyze their pros and cons.

Types of cold wallets

All cold wallets have one common thing — the data is stored offline. However, there are several types of cold wallets, which differ in the degree of protection, physical embodiment and cost of the wallet.

Desktop wallet

Desktop wallets are also known for a high level of protection, in addition to the ability to store crypto currency offline. There are so-called “light” wallets weighing less than 1 gb, and “heavy” wallets weighing more than 1 gb. Two of the desktop wallets can be distinguished:

Exodus Wallet

Multicurrency wallet. It was created in 2016 and supports more than 100 crypto currencies, since 2019 has a phone application. The wallet allows you to export private keys that are created locally, and then to upload them back. Private keys can be discounted to removable media and downloaded only when the transaction is completed. If the user decides to leave private keys on the same computer where the wallet is located, keys are securely encrypted. In order to use your wallet ,there is no need to register or to download the entire blockchain — synchronization is taking place online. In addition to wallet services Exodus Wallet provides an integrated crypto-exchange. The installation file weighs 85 mb.

Bitcoin Core

Bitcoin Core is the official Bitcoin wallet. The size of the wallet is 160 gb, but according to the developers of the company, it’s better to give it a separate winchester with the size of 500 gb. From the security viewpoint, it’s suggested to install a security code or a seed phrase, which may consist 8 words. It is also suggested to copy wallet.dat file. — private wallet key, which will allow you to restore access to your funds.

Hardware wallets

Appears like a regular flash drive with an interface (screen, control keys). This wallet can safely store information about the balance and keys, full functionality is available only when connected to a computer, but the latest models have a special button that allows you to confirm the transaction without connecting to a PC. Each time the device offers to generate a new code-password to confirm the transaction, which significantly reduces the probability of hacking. After generating the code, you need to set a mnemonic phrase (seed) — it consists of 12 or 24 words, which are not related to each other in any way. Such type of wallets has a special protection system that allows you to connect even to potentially infected PCs. The wallets themselves won’t be affected by malware.
The obvious cons of hardware wallets are the following:
  1. It is also possible to lose a device that is so small in size.
  2. A physical device can easily fail due to a variety of damages.
  3. It is not recommended to buy such wallets from “hand”, even from friends, as they can be pre-installed with malware.
As you can see, storing crypto currency with a hardware wallets is very safe and secure, however you should take care about the device. Many people who hold a large amount of crypto currency, in order to not to lose a hardware wallet, store it in a safe deposit box, depriving someone of access to it.

Popular Hardware Wallets models

Trezor One

The first hardware wallet produced in 2013 by the Czech company Satoshi Labs. The device has an OLED display with a pin code, public addresses and Seed phrases. Trezor One has won recognition from users due to its multicurrency and affordable price ($65), it is also considered one of the most secure hardware wallets.
Ledger Nano S
The wallet was released in 2016 by the French company Ledger SAS. Distinctive feature from the other wallets, is the Secure Element controller, which meets banking standards and is certified CC EAL 5+. Also, in order to work with each crypto currency you need to install a special application for this currency on the device, it is not quite convenient, however more secure. The average price of the device is $85.
KeepKey
The purse was released in 2015 in the U.S.. Distinctive feature is OLED display — 256 by 64 pixels. Due to this, you can fully see both the address of the wallet, and the seed phrase. Also, the wallet has a built-in exchange service ShapeShift — an opportunity to exchange crypto currency without entering the exchange. The average price of the device is $50.
BitBox01
Ionos Schnelly’s wallet was invented in Switzerland. In size it’s almost the most compact among all representatives of the hardware wallets. A distinctive feature is the availability of a backup — the card can be multiplied and kept in several places, by analogy with the seed-phrase. In November 2020, support for these wallets will be discontinued, but all owners will be given a 30% discount on the new model. The average price of the device is $55.
CoolWalletS
Developed in Taiwan by CoolBitX, which has long been manufacturing components for Visa and MasterCard. As well as Ledger Nano S has a security standard CC EAL 5+. This wallet works only through smartphones, connecting to them through Bluetooch. The average price of the device is $100.

Paper Wallet

In the age of technological process, plain paper has become a rather reliable method for storing cryptocurrency. With the help of special services, such as bitaddress.org, you can generate public and private keys, then writing them down on paper. You can also print keys as a QR code. To accept transactions with such a wallet, you provide the sender with a public key. To access the funds, you need to find any online wallet that supports your crypto currency. Enter your private key into your online wallet, thus integrating your funds into the system. However, you should understand that after this procedure your wallet will become “hot”.
The best of this storage method — paper wallet is free, its safety depends only from you. When storing a paper wallet to protect it from the fire, water and aging. Also, do not tell other people about where your paper wallet is hidden.
The disadvantages of this storage:
  1. If your wallet is lost, it will be impossible to restore it.
  2. Exposed to a physical damage.
  3. After sending the transaction, you will have to create a new cold wallet.

Offline transaction signature

For this storage method, you will need two PCs. The essence is that the secret keys are never in contact with the Internet, but are stored digitally. Offline transaction method is suitable for people who do not make a daily transactions and have an access to two devices. The process is below:
  1. A hot wallet is installed on a PC with the Internet. The transaction is created without entering private keys and authorization.
  2. The file with transaction is copied and transferred to the second PC without Internet, where private keys are stored.
  3. The transaction is signed offline, copied and transferred back to the PC with the Internet.
In fact, you can do it with one PC and a USB drive. The USB drive will store private keys. Also, you can create a transaction without entering private keys and authorization, after disconnecting the Internet, connect the flash drive, sign the transaction, turn on the Internet. In this case, you should take care of the antivirus system.
The disadvantages of this method:
  1. Using two PCs or a USB drive involves a lot of actions, which is time consuming.
  2. You need to back up your keys in case your PC or flash drive fails.

Multi-signature wallet

This method implies the creation of a wallet, which can be only withdrawn on condition that the transaction is verified by a predetermined number of users. The maximum number of users who can hold private keys of the wallet- is 15. It is considered as one of the most reliable ways of storage, in fact private keys are not only stored offline, but also divided between different people. Often the wallet with multisignatures is used by large crypto-companies, whose management believes that individually employees can not spend the budget. Moreover, when creating this wallet, the number of required multisignatures is minimal. For example: if one of the six keys is lost, the remaining ones will be enough for the transaction.
The disadvantages of this storage:
  1. If most of the keys are lost, access to the funds cannot be restored.
  2. You will not be able to make transactions on your own without the participation of other key holders.

Private Key Fragmentation

The private wallet key consists of 64 symbols. The key is divided into several fragments. They don’t represent anything separately, but if you put all the fragments together, you can access the funds. The key fragments are similar to multisignatures, but in this case you don’t need a multisig-wallet, and the whole process can be done manually.
The disadvantages of this method:
  1. If one fragment is lost, access to funds will be lost.
  2. The maximum level of protection can only be reached when key fragments are distributed to different places, for example: bookshelf, safe deposit box, car. If you divide the key fragments and put them in different boxes — the required level of protection will not be achieved.
When writing down key fragments on paper, protect the key from fire, water and aging.

Conclusion

Digital currencies are not physically expressed and exist only in the digital code, so cold wallets that doesn’t have an access to the Internet, protect cryptocurrencies from the most important and common problem — hacker theft. However, holders of cold wallets need to understand that the safety of a private key depends only on them. There are different ways to store private keys outside the network, but each of them makes it difficult for the user to make transactions.
Hardware wallets that have been specifically designed for this purpose are considered to be the best option for storing cryptocurrencies. With their help it is possible both to store funds off the network and to make transactions easily, without risking the safety of a private key. If you use other cold wallets, it is recommended to combine them with hot wallets. Keep the required crypto currency for daily transfers on hot wallets, and keep all other crypto on cold wallets.
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What’s so great about a hard wallet?

Have you ever accidentally lost a USB? Has someone ever had their shit moved around by a family member? Have any of you ever heard of children and their destructive tendencies? House fires? Burglaries? Let me guess, you store money under your mattress right? Safest place ever. I keep my bitcoin on robinhood because A) I love shorting the hell out of it B) it’s actually safe and insured by robinhood. I have a USB for work and I can’t count how many times I’ve washed it in the washer (amazingly it still works). Have any of you ever wondered why cloud storage is so popular? Because when someone breaks into your house and steals your safe or when your house burns down or floods or whatever, you important stuff is backed up to an online server. Keeping your bitcoin on a hard wallet is as safe as keeping large amounts of cash in your house...think about it
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HOW TO Store Bitcoin On USB Stick Guide 240p Bitcoin Cold Storage Wallet Opendime - Bitcoin Storage/Bearer Bond Bitcoin using Linux boot USB and secondary for a cold storage wallet Store Bitcoin and other altcoins on USB Stick tutorial ...

Offline Wallet Storage. Finally, USB drives offer the highly attractive potential for creating safe and secure offline wallet storage. Offline wallets allow you to safely send transactions without the internet coming into contact with your privacy key file. An issue with any wallet is the need to access an internet interface to make transactions and manage your coins. However, the offline ... Price/Availability; In general, USB drives are inexpensive and easy to find in stores or online. A Bitcoin private key (what you download onto your USB) is 256 bits, so you don’t need to buy a huge 64GB state of the art flash drive. An ordinary, cheap one will do. You likely won’t be waiting months for it to arrive, so you can get to storing your Bitcoin wallet any moment. Replace wallet.dat in ~/.bitcoin directory with wallet.dat from USB drive. Connect to the internet. Restart bitcoin client. Wait for blocks to download (optional). Send bitcoins. How to Setup Watch Bitcoin Address. Watch Bitcoin address is a way for you to check your cold storage balance online without exposing your private key. Create an ... Bitcoin Wallet oder 'Schildbach Wallet' war die erste mobile Bitcoin-Wallet. Bitcoin Wallet ist sicherer als die meisten anderen Bitcoin-Wallets, weil sie einen direkt mit dem Bitcoin-Netzwerk verbindet. Bitcoin Wallet hat ein simples Interface und genau die richtige Menge an Funktionen, die sie zu einer großartigen Wallet und einem großartigen Lernhilfsmittel für Bitcoin-Anfänger macht. The Trezor One was launched in August 2014 and was the first Bitcoin hardware wallet that provided a secure cold storage with the flexibility to transport and spend with convenience like a hot wallet. The company that founder it, Satoshi Labs are a pioneer in the Bitcoin industry. The device features additional security measures such as PIN ...

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HOW TO Store Bitcoin On USB Stick Guide 240p

[HOW TO]- Store Bitcoin On USB Stick - Guide - Duration: 14:01. MrJayBusch 201,257 views. 14:01 . Introduction to Bitcoin Wallets, acquire/spend explained for beginners (Part 1/2) - Duration: 14 ... [HOW TO]- Store Bitcoin On USB Stick - Guide - Duration: 14:01. ... How to Create a Bitcoin Cold Storage Wallet Using Electrum - Duration: 35:15. Rex Kneisley 6,390 views. 35:15 . Jim Rickards ... How to Create a Bitcoin Cold Storage Wallet Using Electrum - Duration: 35:15. Rex Kneisley 7,158 views. 35:15 . The most important skill for improving your life - Duration: 15:24. Better Ideas ... Today I take a look at the OpenDime - a USB bitcoin storage device that basically acts as a bearer bond. You can hand someone Bitcoin in person without the need for that person to have a wallet. Bitcoin 101 - Intro to Paper Wallets & Cold Storage - Bitcoin Security & Fun with Sloppy Wallets - Duration: 26:57. CRI 107,194 views. 26:57. LIVE FOREX TRADING & LIVE FOREX SIGNALS (Join and WIN ...

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